Protests in Iran Grow With Water Shortages

You may have missed it, but since July 15 large anti-regime protests by young people have flared up in more than a dozen cities in the southwestern Khuzestan province of Iran. The enraged residents are protesting severe water shortages caused primarily by negligence and corruption by the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps. The protesters have been chanting slogans such as “We will not accept humiliation” and “Death to Khamenei, death to the dictator.” Videos of the demonstrations and the regime’s brutal response to them, captured and transmitted by citizen journalists at great risk to their… Read More in Real Clear Politics

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Cheer the Bucks Title — and Pols Who Kept the Team in Town

On Tuesday night, the Milwaukee Bucks captured their first NBA championship since 1971. Despite the lack of titles, we Wisconsinites love our sports. I grew up listening to my father and uncles talk about the glorious 1982 Milwaukee Brewers (who lost Game 7 of the World Series to the St. Louis Cardinals). My buddies and I still talk about the 2001 Milwaukee Bucks (and the Glenn Robinson jumper that rimmed out in Game 7 of the Eastern Conference finals against the 76ers). More recently, the University of Wisconsin Badgers’ basketball team has made a habit of getting to the Final

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GA Voting Law; Masks and Students; Quote of the Week

Good morning, it’s Friday, July 23, 2021, the day of the week I pass along quotations intended to be inspirational or thought-provoking. Today’s comes from “Ted Lasso,” the marvelous series on Apple TV+ with Jason Sudeikis in the title role — a persona he created. You may ask, why am I quoting him? Ostensibly, the reason is that the show’s second season starts tonight. And also, well, just because, which I think you’ll understand if you watch it. Ted Lasso is an American football coach who has been cast by cosmic forces beyond his ken into coaching a Premier League

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Biden Gaffe Renews Questions About COVID Transparency

President Biden so desperately wants the vaccine-hesitant part of the country to get their shots that he may have spread a little misinformation. “You are not going to get COVID,” he promised during a CNN town-event Wednesday night, “if you have these vaccines.” Of course, this is not true. Biden knows it. He said as much later during the forum, explaining that, while vaccinated individuals enjoy significant protections, they can still test positive for the virus. But even if that happens, the president pointed out, the vaccine largely mitigates the most serious dangers. “You are not going to… Read More

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Speech Suppression is Habit-Forming

Speech suppression is a habit that the Biden administration and its liberal supporters can’t seem to break. Many staffers may have picked up the habit in their student years: Colleges and universities have been routinely censoring “politically incorrect” speech for the last 30 years. As Thomas Sowell noted, “There are no institutions in America where free speech is more severely restricted than in our politically correct colleges and universities, dominated by liberals.” Now, the Biden administration seems to be giving the colleges and universities some serious competition. Like many… Read More in Real Clear Politics

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JFK — Accept Our Diverse World as It Is

Seven months after the Cuban missile crisis, President John F. Kennedy, at American University, laid out his view on how the East-West struggle should be conducted to avoid a catastrophic war that could destroy us both. Kennedy’s message to Moscow and his fellow Americans: “If [the United States and the Soviet Union] cannot end now our differences, at least we can make the world safe for diversity.” As George Beebe writes in his essay, “It’s a Big World: The Importance of Diversity in American Foreign Policy,” in the July National Interest, Kennedy later elaborated: “We must recognize that… Read More

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Infrastructure: The View From the States

As support for President Biden’s infrastructure plan waxes and wanes, governors, mayors and other state and local lawmakers across the country wait with bated breath in the hopes of much needed infrastructure spending, which has become a life or death issue in communities across the country. The overall picture is well-known: The United States of America is, by most measures, the wealthiest country in the world, yet it ranks 13th when it comes to the overall quality of our infrastructure. The American Society of Civil Engineers gave the nation’s infrastructure an average grade of D+ in its… Read More in

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Can National Solidarity Solve Our Race Problems?

On Oct. 16, 1901, President Theodore Roosevelt invited Booker T. Washington to dine at the White House. As Edmund Morris relates in “Theodore Rex,” many Americans were pleased with this precedent-shattering dinner. But not all. Definitely not all. In the South, disgust and vitriol shook the rafters. A sample of headlines: “Roosevelt Dines a Darkey” and “Our Coon-Flavored President.” Sen. Benjamin Tillman of South Carolina said, “The action of President Roosevelt in entertaining that n—– will necessitate our killing a thousand n—– in the South before they will learn their place… Read More in Real Clear Politics

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Supreme Court Raised the Bar for Challenge to GA Election Law

The Supreme Court’s recent decision in Brnovich v. Democratic National Committee has prompted extensive commentary about the implications for future challenges to election laws under Section 2 of the Voting Rights Act. Litigants arguing that some laws, such as Georgia’s newly enacted SB 202, disproportionately affect racial minorities may have a greater challenge meeting the standard set forth by the court than the standard that some lower courts had been using in recent years. But while the justices split on a 6-3 vote on whether a pair of Arizona statutes ran afoul of the Act, it voted 6-0… Read More

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In the Land of the Boy Who Cried Wolf

Tucker Carlson has an audience of around 3 million viewers, which is more than any other news program and most other programs generally. It is still only 3 million people out of a nation of 330 million people. In the grand scheme of things, Tucker Carlson is influential in the way many others are — he has a core fan base that listens to him, generally trusts him, talks to other people and posts on the internet. Nielsen ratings showed Rush Limbaugh had tens of millions of listeners, but the TV networks rarely focused on him. They focused on Carlson

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